Join me in the cold, dark, life-sustaining NE Pacific Ocean to discover the great beauty, mystery and fragility hidden there.

Posts tagged ‘Slideshow’

What’s At Stake – Images Speaking Louder Than Words

Three minutes of images speaking louder than words . . .

This short slide show of my images testifies to the astonishing marine biodiversity of Northern Vancouver Island and what is put at risk with projects like the Enbridge Northern Gateway Project which would bring super-tanker traffic of toxic bitumen and condensate to B.C.’s fragile coast, and to the waters on which we depend for oxygen, food, buffering of climate change gases, aesthetics and so much more.

I have submitted this slide show for inclusion on “Hope, the Whale”, a 25′ whale sculpture being brought to the Vancouver Enbridge public hearings (January 14 to 18, 2013) “to symbolize the expansive and growing community of people with a vision of an oil-free coast in BC. The sculpture is designed to be a welcoming, collaborative, visual, interactive and peaceful approach to supporting a healthy environment. The whale will amplify our a collective messages of hope and a vision for a healthy ocean, water, land, communities, green economy, cultures and people.” See this link to contribute your message.

For more information, see my testimony to the Joint Review Panel included in my blog item “Super Natural or Super Tanker?” at this link.

One Dive – Photographic Essay

Swimming anemone at Stubbs Island, N. Vancouver Island, BC

Today there was quite a small tidal exchange which allowed us to dive a more challenging site, Stubbs Island.

On larger tides, this island receives so much current that eddies and big upwellings form. All this churning water means there is abundant oxygen and plankton delivery so the density of marine-life on Stubbs Island is truly mind-blowing.  There isn’t a centimetre of rock that does not have something growing on it.

Glen and I would like to share our images from this dive today. We hope they give a sense of the awe-inspiring beauty and biodiversity of our Northern Vancouver Island marine “backyard”.

I’ll let our photos do talking.

Click here for our photos of  –  just one dive at Stubbs Island.

Who’s Your Daddy?

Scalyhead Sculpins are a tiny fish but the males have a giant parenting role (species Artedius harringtoni).

I found what I believe were this species’ eggs while guiding a recent beach study (Port Hardy, BC).

To share this information, and my photos, I’ve tried something new. Below, you’ll find a slideshow that I have narrated to explain how Scalyhead Sculpins are super dads.

Yes, that’s right, you get to hear my voice this week (oh-so-human stumbled speech and all!). Please realize I am speaking as I would to a +/- 10 year old.