Join me in the cold, dark, life-sustaining NE Pacific Ocean to discover the great beauty, mystery and fragility hidden there.

Posts from the ‘REFLECTIONS’ category

My 1,000th Dive – Fishes, Friends and . . . So Much More

Yesterday, I completed dives number 1,000 and 1001.

This is not a big deal if you are a warm water diver where it is common to do 3 or more dives a day.

But, for me at least, I feel it is important to reflect upon this milestone. How did I get here? The equivalent of ~31 days spent underwater over the last 17 years, almost all in the cold, dark NE Pacific off northern Vancouver Island, British Columbia?

And, where am I going?

Younger me on January 9th, 2000 in a wet suit before I had even done a dive from a boat. Now am on to my 2nd battered dry suit and am most often on the other side of a camera.

Younger me on January 9th, 2000 in a wet suit before I had even done a dive from a boat. Now, I’m much greyer; on to my 2nd battered dry suit; and am most often on the other side of a camera.

I was 36 when I started diving. (I’ll save you doing the math – yes, that means I am 53 now). It was a year of some very big life decisions including leaving solid ground when it came to employment and what many would have considered “a career”. I let go. I followed my internal compass knowing only that I needed to learn from Nature again.

Learning to dive did not feel like one of the big decisions. Looking back, it seemed almost like a flirtation; a “sure, why not?”. Maybe that’s the way it works with the big things in life. There were some pretty big clues that it should be on my path though. For example, back when I worked in the Netherlands, I had hung all kinds of marine animals from the ceiling of my shower. Clearly I wanted to feel like I was under the Ocean. Also, my most crystalline, happy childhood memories are of spending seemingly endless hours exploring the beach when we lived in Chemainus (southern Vancouver Island).

Adrift with so many rockfish during yesterday's dives. ©2017 Jackie Hildering.

Adrift with so many rockfish during yesterday’s dives. ©2017 Jackie Hildering.

But know that while saying “yes” to taking a dive course was easy, diving has not come easily to me. I’ll spare you the details of how encumbered the instruction was; that I even inflicted injuries upon myself; and how the learning never stops. (If you would like to see what mask squeeze looks like, click here.) I remember feeling that achieving my Dive Masters was bigger than anything I had achieved in university.

But when I saw that first sea star underwater, it was like a lightning bolt went through me. I knew. It was as if I heard a click, as if a puzzle piece fell into place. This was going to be important. But I could never have known how important.

Lone Mottled Star. Yes, the sea stars are still in trouble. An example of how the Ocean may be testifying to environment issues. See here for more. ©2017 Jackie Hildering.

Lone Mottled Star. Yes, the sea stars are still in trouble – an example of how the Ocean may be testifying to environment issues but because this reality is hidden, too few of us notice and take heed. More information at this link. ©2017 Jackie Hildering.

It felt like a lot of puzzle pieces clicked into place that year. Since then, some have fallen out of place leaving an odd shaped hole. This is certainly how life works. Some pieces never were a good fit or were only part of the big picture for a brief while. Okay, enough already of that puzzle metaphor and about what has come and gone, but was once essential in getting to where I am now.

Now . . . 1,000 dives completed.

Now . . .  the extraordinary privilege of knowing one small part of the planet from individual fish to individual whales. “Knowing”? Correction  . .  I am learning from the life in these cold, dark waters.

Now . . .  “The Marine Detective”.  It’s a handle that I hope captures the mystery and the correct humility. I am a student of the Ocean and, in recognizing that privilege and importance, I want it to count.

The Ocean. Mother Ocean. The ultimate teacher. It’s where life began and upon which life depends. It’s often where the impacts of our disconnect and misguided value systems appear first. It’s our opportunity to have the humility to realize how little we know. It’s our opportunity to connect and to heal and to know how little we are.

Leaving solid ground. Being adrift. Better knowing when and how to fight the current. Learning so many lessons about the life around me and, about myself.

What lies ahead? Another 1,000 dives. More lessons. More puzzle pieces. More trying to make it count.

I am so grateful for it all – to have the health that makes this possible; to being able to live where I do; to my dive buddies; and to you who care enough to read these words, making the effort so worthwhile.

From the depths – thank you.

Below, additional photos from yesterday’s dives shared with fishes, friends, and so much more.

One of yesterday's dives was a Lingcod Egg Mass survey. That's buddy Natasha Dickinson recording depth, size, etc. The males guard the egg masses to ensure their kind has a better chance of survival. More information here. ©2017 Jackie Hildering.

The purpose of one of yesterday’s dives was to do a Lingcod Egg Mass Survey. That’s buddy Natasha Dickinson recording depth, size, etc. The males guard the egg masses to ensure their kind has a better chance of survival. More information on “Lingcod – Fastidious, Fanged Fathers” at this link. ©2017 Jackie Hildering.

 

Dive buddy Natasha examining an unguarded egg mass for the Ling Cod Egg Mass survey. ©2017 Jackie Hildering.

Dive buddy Natasha examining an unguarded egg mass for the Ling Cod Egg Mass Survey. ©2017 Jackie Hildering.

 

Oops - got distracted from the survey by a mature male Wolf Eel. How could I not?! More on this remarkable species here. ©2017 Jackie Hildering.

Oops – got distracted from the survey by a mature male Wolf Eel. How could I not?! More on this remarkable species at this link. ©2017 Jackie Hildering.

 

Swimming with the fishes . . . so many fishes and testament to Rock Fish Conservation Areas being so important. Our dive club has been monitoring this site for over 20 years. ©2017 Jackie Hildering.

Swimming with the fishes . . . so many fishes and testament to Rockfish Conservation Areas being so important. Our dive club has been monitoring this site near Port Hardy for over 20 years. ©2017 Jackie Hildering.

 

Another "distraction" - mature male Wolf Eel. Intriguing that this one had many juvenile rockfish swimming around his head. ©2017 Jackie Hildering.

Another “distraction” – mature male Wolf Eel. Intriguing that this one had many juvenile rockfish swimming around his head. ©2017 Jackie Hildering.

 

Oregon Tritons (marine snail species) feeding on an unguarded Lingcod Egg Mass. ©2017 Jackie Hildering.

Oregon Tritons (marine snail species) feeding on an unguarded Lingcod Egg Mass. ©2017 Jackie Hildering.

 

Dive buddies . . . could not do it without them. Here, Natasha Dickinson and Alexandra Spicer. Dear dive buddy Jacqui Engel was unable to join due to the flu but her name absolutely needs to appear on this post where I am reflecting on 1,000 dives and how I got here. ©2017 Jackie Hildering.

Dive buddies . . . could not do it without them. Here – Natasha Dickinson (left) and Alexandra Spicer (right). Dear dive buddy Jacqui Engel was unable to join yesterday due to the flu but her name absolutely needs to appear anywhere where I am reflecting on the importance of diving in my life and how I got here. [P.S. it was 5.5°C!] ©2017 Jackie Hildering.


Below, a past reflection on diving. I wrote this poem after my 600th dive.  It still all applies.

Constricted by my dry suit,
Thirty pounds bound to my waist,
Hunchbacked by my cylinder,
A mask suctioned to my face,

I leave the world we’ve cultivated,
To attempt to meet our every whim,
To where Nature’s voice can still be heard,
Far above civilization’s din.

No governments, no borders,
Nor economies present.
When down here, I’m reminded,
Of life’s depth and true intent.

I’m an awkward and brief visitor,
In this world of colour and perfection.
I fill with humility, wonder,
Passion and quiet introspection.

For Mother Ocean is home to life,
Older than mammals can comprehend.
I’m grateful that I may learn from her,
Leaving solid ground when I descend.

Diving brought me greater purpose,
Love, vision and camaraderie.
I think that what some find in a church,
I find . . . deep . . . within the sea.

 

May There Be Depth . . .

It’s a time of year of excesses and absences; of light and dark; of warmth and cold; of celebration and elation . . . but also often of freneticism and vacuity.

My wish for you and for myself is that within it all, we find depth – abundant depth of emotion, and connection, and meaning.

My depth of gratitude to all of you who contribute to that for me – the sense of shared values and common goals and the abundant motivation.

Be merry. Be bright. Feel the wonder. Add to the light.

 

White-Spotted Rose Anemone. I've known this individual for about 8 years. ©2016 Jackie Hildering.

White-Spotted Rose Anemone. I’ve known this individual for about 8 years. ©2016 Jackie Hildering.

Dry Land . . .

Just to put some beauty and love into the world . . . for you, here are my above-the-surface photos coupled with the hauntingly beautiful and poignant song “Dry Land” by Joan Armatrading (1975).

All photos are from around NE Vancouver, the area so close to my heart and home to my efforts as The Marine Detective.

Lyrics include:
“Been a long time at sea – and the season of loving – has long awaited me. Tides and waves have kept me – kept me going. I’m longing for the calm . . . .”

If video does not show above, please see www.youtube.com/watch?v=aHUiN8dEnpI.

We are the environment . . .

Below, please see a collection of my images and texts I have been posting as “#OceanVoice”.

At this critical time of decision-making, they are directed at increasing hope; awareness of our connection to the environment; and positive action for the sake of greater health and happiness

Hoping they thoughts resound with you.

From the depths  . . .

It is such a limitation to think, and feel, and speak in a way that this is somehow about something outside ourselves . . . saving “the environment.” We are the environment. It’s not about saving something outside ourselves . . . whales, wetlands, trees, fish. It’s about choices that benefit ourselves and future generations, providing the greatest chances for health and happiness. It’s about children. That's what all these photos and words are about here on "The Marine Detective" folks. Inspiration. Connection. Understanding our capacity for positive change. Caring More. Consuming Less. Voting for the future. And, knowing our place IN the environment. ©2015 Jackie Hildering; #OceanVoice; www.TheMarineDetective.ca

©2015 Jackie Hildering; #OceanVoice.

Caption for the above image: It is such a limitation to think, and feel, and speak in a way that this is somehow about something outside ourselves . . . saving “the environment.” We are the environment. It’s not about saving something outside ourselves . . . whales, wetlands, trees, fish. It’s about choices that benefit ourselves and future generations, providing the greatest chances for health and happiness. It’s about children. That’s what all these photos and words are about here on “The Marine Detective” folks. Inspiration. Connection. Understanding our capacity for positive change. Caring More. Consuming Less. Voting for the future. And, knowing our place IN the environment.

Vote as if you can feel the warmth of your grandchild's hand in yours. Spencer Wilson meets an Ochre Star. As so many here are aware, it is a critical time of decision-making. In this #OceanVoice album, I will share memes directed at increasing hope; awareness of our connection to the environment; and positive action for the sake of greater health and happiness. ©2015 Jackie Hildering; #OceanVoice; www.TheMarineDetective.ca

©2015 Jackie Hildering; #OceanVoice.

Caption for above image: Vote as if you can feel the warmth of your grandchild’s hand in yours. Spencer Wilson meets an Ochre Star.

Yes, I'm going there. It is a critical time of decision-making. Those that have the power now use fear as a blunt tool to perpetuate false dichotomies like jobs vs. the environment / social problems vs. environmental problems. "Saving our planet, lifting people out of poverty, advancing economic growth . . . these are one and the same fight . . . Solutions to one problem must be solutions for all." What a wonderful world it would be if more would connect the dots between climate change, global health, food security, sustainable employment, children’s safety, and gender equality*. We have tremendous potential for positive change when fear is replaced with knowledge and empowerment. It is an essential time to reach out - reducing fear; connecting the dots; creating positive change. ©2015 Jackie Hildering; #OceanVoice; www.TheMarineDetective.ca

©2015 Jackie Hildering; #OceanVoice

Caption for above image: Yes, I’m going there. It is a critical time of decision-making. Those that have the power now use fear as a blunt tool to perpetuate false dichotomies like jobs vs. the environment / social problems vs. environmental problems. “Saving our planet, lifting people out of poverty, advancing economic growth . . . these are one and the same fight . . . solutions to one problem must be solutions for all.” What a wonderful world it would be if more would connect the dots between climate change, global health, food security, sustainable employment, children’s safety, and gender equality*. We have tremendous potential for positive change when fear is replaced with knowledge and empowerment. It is an essential time to reach out – reducing fear; connecting the dots; creating positive change.

Fear . . . such a limiting factor to positive change. A lesson learned from Killer Whales - how wrong we can be but how quickly we can change when fear and misunderstanding are replaced by knowledge and connection. Yes, fear sometimes saves lives but too often: Fear masks truth. Fear chokes potential. Fear makes us automatons, marching on, ignoring the reality around us. Fear walks hand-in-hand with disempowerment, the same neurons firing, limiting the way we look at the world and ourselves. And above all, FEAR LOATHES CHANGE. Thereby, fear is such a powerful tool to be used by those who benefit from things remaining the same. #OceanVoice - thoughts about hope, our connection to the environment, and positive action for the sake of greater health and happiness. ©2015 Jackie Hildering; #OceanVoice; www.TheMarineDetective.ca

©2015 Jackie Hildering; #OceanVoice

Caption for above image: Fear . . . such a limiting factor to positive change. A lesson learned from Killer Whales – how wrong we can be but how quickly we can change when fear and misunderstanding are replaced by knowledge and connection. Yes, fear sometimes saves lives but too often: Fear masks truth. Fear chokes potential. Fear makes us automatons, marching on, ignoring the reality around us. Fear walks hand-in-hand with disempowerment, the same neurons firing, limiting the way we look at the world and ourselves. And above all, fear loathes change. Thereby, fear is such a powerful tool to be used by those who benefit from things remaining the same. #OceanVoice – thoughts about hope, our connection to the environment, and positive action for the sake of greater health and happiness.

When the Ocean erupts, revealing one of her giants (Ripple the female Humpback Whale breaching; BCX1063). It's an opportunity to be awash in wonder, humility, connection, and gratitude. We all depend on the Ocean and where we go from here depends upon knowing while we are so small, our value systems and daily actions have such big impacts. How we consume; how we vote; how much we recognize our great capacity for positive change and how fear of change limits this . . . it's enough to bring giants back from the brink AND increase human happiness. ©2015 Jackie Hildering; #OceanVoice; www.TheMarineDetective.ca

©2015 Jackie Hildering; #OceanVoice

Caption for above image: When the Ocean erupts, revealing one of her giants (Ripple the female Humpback Whale breaching; BCX1063). It’s an opportunity to be awash in wonder, humility, connection, and gratitude. We all depend on the Ocean and where we go from here depends upon knowing while we are so small, our value systems and daily actions have such big impacts. How we consume; how we vote; how much we recognize our great capacity for positive change and how fear of change limits this . . . it’s enough to bring giants back from the brink AND increase human happiness.

Vitamin O. Where are you as you read this? Are you far from the Ocean's shore or feeling her waves below your feet? It doesn't matter. We are ALL part Ocean from the oxygen in our lungs (50%+); to the fluid in our veins; and many of the nutrients that build us. Our connection to the Ocean is the great common denominator of life on this blue planet. Healing, climate regulating, carbon dioxide buffering . . . life sustaining. Share the Vitamin, especially to our friends further inland? Increased awareness of the importance of the Ocean and celebrating our connection to it . . . why, it could change the world. Acknowledging how little we know, inspired by the mystery and beauty; embracing the appropriate humility and precaution in our daily actions . . . caring more, consuming less, voting for the future . . . . knowing the vital importance of Vitamin O. ©2015 Jackie Hildering; #OceanVoice; www.TheMarineDetective.ca

©2015 Jackie Hildering; #OceanVoice

Caption for above image: Vitamin O. Where are you as you read this? Are you far from the Ocean’s shore or feeling her waves below your feet? It doesn’t matter. We are ALL part Ocean from the oxygen in our lungs (50%+); to the fluid in our veins; and many of the nutrients that build us. Our connection to the Ocean is the great common denominator of life on this blue planet. Healing, climate regulating, carbon dioxide buffering . . . life sustaining.  Acknowledging how little we know, inspired by the mystery and beauty; embracing the appropriate humility and precaution in our daily actions . . . caring more, consuming less, voting for the future . . . . knowing the vital importance of Vitamin O.

Follow Your Dreams . . .

Follow Your Dreams – and make them count.

What’s with the stained and faded photo below?

Follow Your Dreams . . . Northern Resident Killer Whales: Tsitika (A30, 1949 - 2013) and her son Pointer (A39, 1975 - 2014. Photo taken in 1999. ©Jackie Hildering; www.TheMarineDetective.ca

Follow Your Dreams . . .
Northern Resident Killer Whales: Tsitika (A30, 1949 – 2013) and her son Pointer (A39, 1975 – 2014. Photo taken in 1999. ©Jackie Hildering; http://www.TheMarineDetective.ca

Introspection alert!

This photo has been on a beloved friend’s refrigerator for almost 16 years. I sent it to my nearest and dearest as a new year’s greeting at the end of 1999 after leaving my “career” as a teacher and school administrator in Rotterdam.

It references following my need to be learning from Nature, not speaking about it as if it were somewhere else, and to find a more effective way to enable understanding of connection and common solutions to socio-environmental problems.

It led me back to BC; to being a deckhand; and to Orca. Orca as extraordinarily powerful ambassadors of of how wrong we can be; how quickly we can change; and the repercussions of humanity gone mad with chemical use and consumerism. It led to diving and underwater photography as part of my love of this place. It led to Humpback research when the giants returned. All the while, teaching and finding those like yourself along the way, the like-minded helping to maybe make it count all the more.

Today, I found myself staring back at this old photo, thinking back and reflecting forward. The two whales have now passed – Tsitika (A30, 1949 – 2013) and her son Pointer (A39, 1975 – 2014). Stained, fuzzy, faded, and slightly torn, the photo brings me back through the years, reminding me of how much I’ve learned from them and this place.

I feel fortified. There are more decisions to be made to take the path less travelled. I need to trust that I will look back in another 16 years feeling that my internal compass allowed me to navigate sometimes stormy, lonely, scary, unknown waters to land again where following dreams that are motivated by good, will lead to greater good.

Today, my The Marine Detective Facebook page tipped over 9,000 which is what catalyzed this introspection.

For all you here too on the blog, I want to thank you for the sense of community you provide and the fuel to keep at it through your comments, promotion, and support through calendars, canvases, etc.

From the depths . . . . thank you. 

And They Spread Their Giant Wing-Like Fins . . .

TMD Memes.001

And they spread their giant wing-like fins . . . and returned from the brink.

The whales remind us of our great capacity for positive change . . . when our value systems change and knowledge, connection and humility replace fear and misunderstanding.

The simple solution? Care More. Consume Less.

There are still so many ways to indirectly kill a whale and damage the life-sustaining seas upon which we all depend.

Image is of “Jigger” the mature female Humpback Whale who breached for 18 minutes. More images below.

You simply can’t be the same after seeing something like this, nor would I want to be.

What triggered this behaviour may have been an encounter with another Humpback (“Slash” BCX0177″) but we cannot know for sure.

For the work of our Marine Education and Research Society, please see here and yes, you can support our work by sponsoring a Humpback Whale!

HW_2015-07-25_JH_White Cliffs-15374 HW_2015-07-25_JH_White Cliffs-15389 HW_2015-07-25_JH_White Cliffs-15390 HW_2015-07-25_JH_White Cliffs-15392 HW_2015-07-25_JH_White Cliffs-15396 HW_2015-07-25_JH_White Cliffs-15415 HW_2015-07-25_JH_White Cliffs-15421 HW_2015-07-25_JH_White Cliffs-15424 HW_2015-07-25_JH_White Cliffs-15425 HW_2015-07-25_JH_White Cliffs-15426 HW_2015-07-25_JH_White Cliffs-15454 HW_2015-07-25_JH_White Cliffs-15494

From the depths . . . .

"The Marine Detective" art show at 546 Yates in Victoria. Includes a 15 min rotating slide show of images. Come in, sit down, and disappear into the depths for a little while?

“The Marine Detective” art show at 546 Yates in Victoria. Includes a 15 min rotating slide show of images. Come in, sit down, and disappear into the depths for a little while?

It is the morning after the opening of my first art show and I am awash with a sense of gratitude and community.

As I strived to express last night in my presentation, had anyone told me way-back-when that I would ever have an art show, it would have been the equivalent of being told that I would undertake interplanetary travel.

An art show?! It was very high threshold for me because, rather than just striving to capture the mystery, beauty and fragility of the Ocean to inspire and educate, the images are being put forward as ART.

Therefore, last night was very much for me another “How did I get here?” experience.

But I do know the answer. It is because, however the magic of life works, I have been allowed to fully, deeply understand the importance of the Ocean as the life-sustaining force on the planet.  And, as a teacher, enhancing the potential for our children to have healthy, happy futures will always be what gives my life direction.

"The Marine Detective" images at Art Atelier 546 in Victoria (on 546 Yates Street). Click to enlarge.

“The Marine Detective” images at Art Atelier 546 in Victoria (on 546 Yates Street). Click to enlarge.

How did I get here?  It has to do with geography, opportunity, difficult and daring decisions made, skills, experience and  . . . you.

Please hear me. It has to do with YOU.

Wherever this is going – wherever it has gone – it is because of a force of people who share the values and objectives of “The Marine Detective” and want it to move forward.

The sense of gratitude I am overcome with this morning, and that is so difficult to express, is that I feel I am being held up by an Ocean of people . . . . those who were at the opening last night; the whispers and shouts of support and encouragement on social media; the sharing to expand the reach of the content there; the applause expressed in so many ways; the enablement of diving, photography and whale research; the sharing of calendars and prints into the world so that they might further connect others; the assistance re. potential books, webisodes, whatever  . . . it’s you.

I know that The Marine Detective is a community working for greater understanding and positive action for socio-environmental good.

From the depths, thank you.

Because of you I speak louder; I dare more; I keep at it and, I stay afloat . . . gently propelled to who-knows-where.

Link to photos – here. 

Photo by Andrew Topham, made possible with Melanie Wood.

Photo by Andrew Topham, made possible with Melanie Wood.

 

 

 

The Best Diet Ever!

Got your attention didn’t I?

Breathe in the beauty and the health benefits. Lose heaviness. Gain happiness. Kayaking with Jacqui Engel. ©Jackie Hildering

Breathe in the beauty and the health benefits. Lose heaviness. Gain happiness. [Kayaking with Jacqui Engel. ©Jackie Hildering.]

It’s December 31st, a time when many of us are reflecting on how we want to feel in the new year.

Do you want to . . . .

  • Lose heaviness?
  • Gain optimism?
  • Be more empowered?
  • Feel happier?
  • Change the world for the better?

Me too and in my year-end reflections, I have reminded myself that I know the science of how this can be achieved and have had the privilege of living the experience.

More Nature = More Happy. Friend Natasha Dickinson after a dive. ©Jackie Hildering

More Nature = More Happy. [Friend Natasha Dickinson after a dive. ©Jackie Hildering.]

Let me share the secret that could lead to such profound positive change – for you, for me and for generations to come.

Do NOT count the calories in your food intake.

Rather, LOSE heaviness and GAIN health and happiness by . . . drinking in more Nature. 

What to measure?

  • How little garbage you produce;
  • How little “stuff” your purchase;
  • How low your fuel costs are (home and vehicle); and
  • Most importantly, how much time you spend outdoors.

Spend more time on the water, under the water, atop a mountain or beside a tree.

Even the smell of the  forest creates health benefits. Forest walk with friend Jacqui Engel. ©Jackie Hildering.

Even the smell of the forest creates health benefits. [Forest walk with friend Jacqui Engel. ©Jackie Hildering.]


It’s that easy and yes, this is science-based.

Research has shown that the Japanese practice of “forest bathing” (Shinrin-yoku) measurably increases well-being and decreases our eating ourselves up inside. Even the smell of the forest reduces blood pressure, heart rate and stress hormone production; and increases the production of natural killer cell (NK cells) which combat infections and tumour cell activity (Lee et al).

It’s not really a surprise that being outside and caring for Nature is, well, our natural state of well-being. 

It’s where our happiness lies and thereby, the name of this heaviness losing regime is – The Happiness Diet.

Because what’s good for the planet and all the beings we share it with is also good for you. Of course it is.

Grandma Cedar and I. Lots of happy and health going on here.

Grandma Cedar and I. Lots of happy and healthy going on here.

Truly thrive. Feel more alive.

Use less. Care more.

And when you shine with lightness and people ask, “What’s your secret?”, please, please, please – tell them!

For this is a secret that could truly change the world.

Wishing you health, happiness, and WILD adventure in 2015 and beyond.

Source:
J. Lee, Q. Li, L. Tyrväinen et al., “Nature therapy and preventive medicine,” in Public Health-Social and Behavioral Health, J. Maddock, Ed., chapter 16, pp. 325–350, Intech, Rijeka, Croatia, 2012.

Rainbow and Pacific White-Sided Dolphins. ©Jackie Hildering.

Rainbow and Pacific White-Sided Dolphins. ©Jackie Hildering.

Thank Goodness for Second Chances . . . .

It’s Canadian Thanksgiving and I am overwhelmed with depth of gratitude and purpose.

It is an extraordinary privilege to be able to live the life I do and I want so much for it to count.

Thank you dear readers for helping to amplify the beauty, mystery and fragility into the world so that there may be more understanding that there is no divide between land and sea and how our daily actions regarding chemical and energy use connect us – no matter how far away from this place you are.

The photo below is from two days ago – “Frosty” the Humpback Whale in Johnstone Strait, NE Vancouver Island.

To think we could have lost these glorious, majestic, mysterious, winged, singing, acrobatic ambassadors of our life-sustaining seas . . . .

Thank goodness for second chances.

Frosty the Humpback Whale (BCX1187) in Johnstone Strait, October 11, 2014. Just outside Telegraph Cove. Blinkhorn Light in the background. ©Jackie Hildering.

Frosty the Humpback Whale (BCX1187) in Johnstone Strait, October 11, 2014. Just outside Telegraph Cove. Blinkhorn Light in the background. ©Jackie Hildering.

We are Wholly Dependent & Connected to the Ocean

Reflections for Oceans Day 2014.

We are wholly dependent and connected to the Ocean.

Life on land cannot survive without the Ocean.

It is life in the Ocean that will testify to magnitude of environmental problems first.

Change is needed; and we humans have an astounding capacity to make a positive difference.

Oceans Day 2014

Likely as a reader of “The Marine Detective”, you already share the following perspective:

The majority of messaging we get is controlled by those with power in the current paradigm not wanting us to change our value systems, and consumer and voter behaviour.

Therefore, they perpetuate:

  • Fear;
  • Ignorance, uncertainty and inaction by limiting access to independent science;
  • The notion that it is jobs OR the environment;
  • The fallacy that being good for the environment is about loss rather than joy; and
  • The mythology that consuming more will certainly make us happier and more “successful”.

What a different world it would be if:

  • More of us were to consume less and care more;
  • Value time and health over possessions;
  • Think in terms of an economy of chemicals and energy use instead of just money;
  • Know that there is no divide between land and sea and that Ocean sustains human life;
  • Be empowered;
  • And . . . . be happier.

Spread the word?

Happy Oceans Day.