Join me in the cold, dark, life-sustaining NE Pacific Ocean to discover the great beauty, mystery and fragility hidden there.

Life Begins Anew

Dear readers, look! Just look!

These photos are from today. The baby Bull Kelp is growing toward the sun. With these images, I have tried to capture the aching beauty of the light “dancing” over the flowing fronds, creating rippling spectrums.

I cannot express in the way I want how watching this interplay filled me with a sense of comfort, continuance, exaltation and even relief.

While humans collide, love and lose, and may not even know what winning is, this continues despite it all (at least for now).

Life begins anew . . . the marvel of another spring . Phenology.

“Our” part of the planet is now tilted closer to the sun. Tomorrow, March 20th, coincidentally is spring equinox when the sun’s rays directly grace the equator in the earth’s journey around the sun. As we spin, the northern regions of the earth will progressively get more sun. It’s the first day of spring for we in the northern half of the planet.

There is more light to fuel the kelp’s growth and leads to food, oxygen, refuge, reduced carbon dioxide and whatever this heady, healing, emotional cocktail is that I am feeling right now. 💙

I hope some of that transmits to you, through the photos and my effusiveness. ☺️


All photos here: March 19, 2022 northeast Vancouver Island in Kwakwaka’wakw Territory ©Jackie Hildering with dive buddy Natasha Dickinson.


More about this version of Bull Kelp and it’s growth rate:

Kelp species and seaweeds are not plants. They are algae.

What you see in these photos is the “sporophyte” stage of Bull Kelp (Nereocystis luetkeana). It results from the reproduction of a completely different looking version of the same species, the “gametophye”. Yes, it’s alternation of generations and I have a blog about it here.

The stipe (stem-like structure) of Bull Kelp can grow to be up to 36 m long. The stipe would have to grow an average of 17 cm a day to reach this length in the 210-day growing period (source: Druel). It has to grow so quickly to reach the sun and be able to photosynthesize and help support life on earth.

If you include both the rate of growth of the stipe and the fronds (leaf-like structures), Bull Kelp can grow 25 cm per day on average to reach the surface (source: Duncan).  


My additional posts about Bull Kelp include:


Sources:

16 Responses to “Life Begins Anew”

  1. Karen Hanegan

    Gorgeous photos, Jackie; thanks so very much for sharing! Sent from Mail for Windows From: The Marine DetectiveSent: Saturday, March 19, 2022 11:06 PMTo: hanegake10@gmail.comSubject: [New post] Life Begins Anew The Marine Detective posted: " Dear readers, look! Just look! These photos are from today. The baby Bull Kelp is growing toward the sun. With these images, I have tried to capture the aching beauty of the light "dancing" over the flowing fronds, creating rippling spectrums. "

    Reply
  2. Margaret a.k.a. BP

    Oh! Thank you dear Jackie for expressing your exhilaration and sharing your joy so well through these marvelous images. I truly felt the baby bull kelp dance in response to the sunlight they reach towards. You brought me such happy wonder and hope on this equinox morning.

    Reply
  3. jude

    Such gorgeousness in this world! You really captured the sun and the water on the kelp.

    Reply
  4. Wendy Feltham

    What amazing images! I find kelp washed ashore, and marvel at it looking down from piers. It’s beautiful, but never so fresh, luminous, and perfect as what you’ve captured here. Happy spring!

    Reply
  5. rgpummellgmailcom

    Thank you for these beautiful images on this first day of spring! I love your sense of joy and marvel at what nature is unfolding to us. Rhonda Pummell.

    On Sat, Mar 19, 2022 at 11:06 PM The Marine Detective wrote:

    > The Marine Detective posted: ” Dear readers, look! Just look! These photos > are from today. The baby Bull Kelp is growing toward the sun. With these > images, I have tried to capture the aching beauty of the light “dancing” > over the flowing fronds, creating rippling spectrums. ” >

    Reply
  6. Paul

    The vis looks wonderful and your use of backlighting using the sky makes this jump off the screen and into our brains. You haven’t mentioned it but I will is that once those fronds start moving, the tide has turned and your impulse is to hang onto the kelp instead of struggle against the current while trying to set up and get these shots. Well done Jackie – what a fun day beneath the surface.

    Reply
    • The Marine Detective

      How it makes me smile to have this feedback from you Paul. You know it! EVERYTHING is moving and you don’t want to damage anything and the light source is challenging and, and, and when it succeeds = HAPPINESS!

      Reply
  7. Kathy

    Love the dancing kelp in the spring sunlight! Thank you for sharing your pictures!

    Reply
  8. Elizabeth

    Hi there Jackie,
    Thanks for showing these stunning photos of the glorious Baby Bull Kelp! Never lose your ‘effusiveness’ it lights up the world (and helps me build my vocabulary for Wordle). I appreciate how you help us awaken to, and then look for, the miracles of so-called everyday life.
    👏
    Liz Heinz

    Reply

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