Join me in the cold, dark, life-sustaining NE Pacific Ocean to discover the great beauty, mystery and fragility hidden there.

Posts tagged ‘Importance of the Ocean’

We are the environment . . .

Below, please see a collection of my images and texts I have been posting as “#OceanVoice”.

At this critical time of decision-making, they are directed at increasing hope; awareness of our connection to the environment; and positive action for the sake of greater health and happiness

Hoping they thoughts resound with you.

From the depths  . . .

It is such a limitation to think, and feel, and speak in a way that this is somehow about something outside ourselves . . . saving “the environment.” We are the environment. It’s not about saving something outside ourselves . . . whales, wetlands, trees, fish. It’s about choices that benefit ourselves and future generations, providing the greatest chances for health and happiness. It’s about children. That's what all these photos and words are about here on "The Marine Detective" folks. Inspiration. Connection. Understanding our capacity for positive change. Caring More. Consuming Less. Voting for the future. And, knowing our place IN the environment. ©2015 Jackie Hildering; #OceanVoice; www.TheMarineDetective.ca

©2015 Jackie Hildering; #OceanVoice.

Caption for the above image: It is such a limitation to think, and feel, and speak in a way that this is somehow about something outside ourselves . . . saving “the environment.” We are the environment. It’s not about saving something outside ourselves . . . whales, wetlands, trees, fish. It’s about choices that benefit ourselves and future generations, providing the greatest chances for health and happiness. It’s about children. That’s what all these photos and words are about here on “The Marine Detective” folks. Inspiration. Connection. Understanding our capacity for positive change. Caring More. Consuming Less. Voting for the future. And, knowing our place IN the environment.

Vote as if you can feel the warmth of your grandchild's hand in yours. Spencer Wilson meets an Ochre Star. As so many here are aware, it is a critical time of decision-making. In this #OceanVoice album, I will share memes directed at increasing hope; awareness of our connection to the environment; and positive action for the sake of greater health and happiness. ©2015 Jackie Hildering; #OceanVoice; www.TheMarineDetective.ca

©2015 Jackie Hildering; #OceanVoice.

Caption for above image: Vote as if you can feel the warmth of your grandchild’s hand in yours. Spencer Wilson meets an Ochre Star.

Yes, I'm going there. It is a critical time of decision-making. Those that have the power now use fear as a blunt tool to perpetuate false dichotomies like jobs vs. the environment / social problems vs. environmental problems. "Saving our planet, lifting people out of poverty, advancing economic growth . . . these are one and the same fight . . . Solutions to one problem must be solutions for all." What a wonderful world it would be if more would connect the dots between climate change, global health, food security, sustainable employment, children’s safety, and gender equality*. We have tremendous potential for positive change when fear is replaced with knowledge and empowerment. It is an essential time to reach out - reducing fear; connecting the dots; creating positive change. ©2015 Jackie Hildering; #OceanVoice; www.TheMarineDetective.ca

©2015 Jackie Hildering; #OceanVoice

Caption for above image: Yes, I’m going there. It is a critical time of decision-making. Those that have the power now use fear as a blunt tool to perpetuate false dichotomies like jobs vs. the environment / social problems vs. environmental problems. “Saving our planet, lifting people out of poverty, advancing economic growth . . . these are one and the same fight . . . solutions to one problem must be solutions for all.” What a wonderful world it would be if more would connect the dots between climate change, global health, food security, sustainable employment, children’s safety, and gender equality*. We have tremendous potential for positive change when fear is replaced with knowledge and empowerment. It is an essential time to reach out – reducing fear; connecting the dots; creating positive change.

Fear . . . such a limiting factor to positive change. A lesson learned from Killer Whales - how wrong we can be but how quickly we can change when fear and misunderstanding are replaced by knowledge and connection. Yes, fear sometimes saves lives but too often: Fear masks truth. Fear chokes potential. Fear makes us automatons, marching on, ignoring the reality around us. Fear walks hand-in-hand with disempowerment, the same neurons firing, limiting the way we look at the world and ourselves. And above all, FEAR LOATHES CHANGE. Thereby, fear is such a powerful tool to be used by those who benefit from things remaining the same. #OceanVoice - thoughts about hope, our connection to the environment, and positive action for the sake of greater health and happiness. ©2015 Jackie Hildering; #OceanVoice; www.TheMarineDetective.ca

©2015 Jackie Hildering; #OceanVoice

Caption for above image: Fear . . . such a limiting factor to positive change. A lesson learned from Killer Whales – how wrong we can be but how quickly we can change when fear and misunderstanding are replaced by knowledge and connection. Yes, fear sometimes saves lives but too often: Fear masks truth. Fear chokes potential. Fear makes us automatons, marching on, ignoring the reality around us. Fear walks hand-in-hand with disempowerment, the same neurons firing, limiting the way we look at the world and ourselves. And above all, fear loathes change. Thereby, fear is such a powerful tool to be used by those who benefit from things remaining the same. #OceanVoice – thoughts about hope, our connection to the environment, and positive action for the sake of greater health and happiness.

When the Ocean erupts, revealing one of her giants (Ripple the female Humpback Whale breaching; BCX1063). It's an opportunity to be awash in wonder, humility, connection, and gratitude. We all depend on the Ocean and where we go from here depends upon knowing while we are so small, our value systems and daily actions have such big impacts. How we consume; how we vote; how much we recognize our great capacity for positive change and how fear of change limits this . . . it's enough to bring giants back from the brink AND increase human happiness. ©2015 Jackie Hildering; #OceanVoice; www.TheMarineDetective.ca

©2015 Jackie Hildering; #OceanVoice

Caption for above image: When the Ocean erupts, revealing one of her giants (Ripple the female Humpback Whale breaching; BCX1063). It’s an opportunity to be awash in wonder, humility, connection, and gratitude. We all depend on the Ocean and where we go from here depends upon knowing while we are so small, our value systems and daily actions have such big impacts. How we consume; how we vote; how much we recognize our great capacity for positive change and how fear of change limits this . . . it’s enough to bring giants back from the brink AND increase human happiness.

Vitamin O. Where are you as you read this? Are you far from the Ocean's shore or feeling her waves below your feet? It doesn't matter. We are ALL part Ocean from the oxygen in our lungs (50%+); to the fluid in our veins; and many of the nutrients that build us. Our connection to the Ocean is the great common denominator of life on this blue planet. Healing, climate regulating, carbon dioxide buffering . . . life sustaining. Share the Vitamin, especially to our friends further inland? Increased awareness of the importance of the Ocean and celebrating our connection to it . . . why, it could change the world. Acknowledging how little we know, inspired by the mystery and beauty; embracing the appropriate humility and precaution in our daily actions . . . caring more, consuming less, voting for the future . . . . knowing the vital importance of Vitamin O. ©2015 Jackie Hildering; #OceanVoice; www.TheMarineDetective.ca

©2015 Jackie Hildering; #OceanVoice

Caption for above image: Vitamin O. Where are you as you read this? Are you far from the Ocean’s shore or feeling her waves below your feet? It doesn’t matter. We are ALL part Ocean from the oxygen in our lungs (50%+); to the fluid in our veins; and many of the nutrients that build us. Our connection to the Ocean is the great common denominator of life on this blue planet. Healing, climate regulating, carbon dioxide buffering . . . life sustaining.  Acknowledging how little we know, inspired by the mystery and beauty; embracing the appropriate humility and precaution in our daily actions . . . caring more, consuming less, voting for the future . . . . knowing the vital importance of Vitamin O.

We are Wholly Dependent & Connected to the Ocean

Reflections for Oceans Day 2014.

We are wholly dependent and connected to the Ocean.

Life on land cannot survive without the Ocean.

It is life in the Ocean that will testify to magnitude of environmental problems first.

Change is needed; and we humans have an astounding capacity to make a positive difference.

Oceans Day 2014

Likely as a reader of “The Marine Detective”, you already share the following perspective:

The majority of messaging we get is controlled by those with power in the current paradigm not wanting us to change our value systems, and consumer and voter behaviour.

Therefore, they perpetuate:

  • Fear;
  • Ignorance, uncertainty and inaction by limiting access to independent science;
  • The notion that it is jobs OR the environment;
  • The fallacy that being good for the environment is about loss rather than joy; and
  • The mythology that consuming more will certainly make us happier and more “successful”.

What a different world it would be if:

  • More of us were to consume less and care more;
  • Value time and health over possessions;
  • Think in terms of an economy of chemicals and energy use instead of just money;
  • Know that there is no divide between land and sea and that Ocean sustains human life;
  • Be empowered;
  • And . . . . be happier.

Spread the word?

Happy Oceans Day.

Mother Ocean

A short Oceans Day Reflection for you dear The Marine Detective Community.

Happy, healthy Oceans Day. 

Click to enlarge and feel very free to share.

Click to enlarge and feel very free to share.

For You For Oceans Day – for you love her as I do.

Dear “The Marine Detective” Community,

An Oceans Day reflection for you. 

If you can’t read the text, please click the image to enlarge.

May we continue to work together to raise awareness about the great beauty and importance of our Ocean. For life on land cannot survive without the Ocean. The Ocean is the “circulatory, respiratory, and reproductive organs of our planet” (from “The Fate of the Ocean” by Julia Whitty).

More than 70% of the oxygen in our atmosphere comes from it. The Ocean feeds us and regulates our climate by buffering the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide and absorbing 85% of the Earth’s heat.

We depend on her for transportation, food, water, disposal, recreation, energy, oxygen, climate regulation and … inspiration.

Happy, healthy Oceans Day to you. 

Oceans Day 2011 – The Wisdom of James Cameron

Mature male fish eating( (“resident”) killer whale – “Skeena” (A13; born 1978; missing 2010). Photo – Hildering.

June 8th is World Oceans Day (originating from the 1992 Rio de Janeiro Earth Summit and recognized by the United Nations since 2008). 

In reflecting on what I can best share with you to honour Oceans Day and make clear the human dependence and impact on the oceans, I have decided that no one has made these points more solidly and eloquently than fellow Canadian, James Cameron. He is a lifelong activist for marine conservation who, among many other achievements,  is the award-winning director of “Titanic” and  “Avatar”. 

Below, please read, and heed, the text from his 1998 acceptance speech for the SeaKeeper Award.  Thirteen years on, the message is more important and urgent –  than ever.  

View towards Alert Bay, Northern Vancouver Island. Photo – Hildering

“Every living soul on earth, no matter how far inland they live or how much they may hate eating fish, is utterly dependent on the divine saltwater soup of the ocean. The ocean is the engine that drives our weather and moderates our climate. The phytoplankton in the seas create the majority of the oxygen we breathe. These microscopic plants also form the bottom of a vast food chain from which we harvest a large portion of our food.

As our population increases, and arable land remains finite, we will look to the oceans more and more for our survival. Thus, our destiny as a species is interlocked with the destiny of the sea. If the seas become sick, we become sick. If they die, we die. Subconsciously we think the sea will always be there for us. 

Sunset Port McNeill. Photo – Hildering.

Right now, all over the world, coral reefs are threatened, and 40-mile-long drift nets cut huge, sterile swaths through the open ocean. Biologists estimate that over one hundred million undiscovered species remain to be identified in the oceans. We will kill half of these before, we have even had a chance to give them names.

Life began in the sea over three billion years ago. Our first upright walking ancestors appeared a mere four million years ago, and human civilization is less than ten thousand years old. If the natural history of life on earth could be viewed as a single Great Year, all of human recorded history inhabits the last couple of seconds of the last minute before midnight at the end of that year. And yet, in those last seconds, that eyeblink, we have multiplied exponentially, and our impact on the natural world has increased logarithmically.

It took the entire history of humankind to produce a global population of a billion people by the year 1800. By 1930, in just over a century, it had doubled to two billion. In another fifty years, it had doubled again to four. Now, at close to 6 billion, we are likely to double again in less than thirty years. picture it, 12 billion human souls, human mouths, crying out for food, struggling to survive, competing for resources, choking in a poisoned and depleted world, and all within the lifetime of our children.

Sunset off the coast of Northern Vancouver Island. Photo – Hildering.

We are alive now, and doing those works for which we will be remembered, at the most critical instant in the history of the Earth. Millions of years of natural evolution are focusing down to a few decades during which the game will be won or lost. And like it or not, we are the players in that game.

This is both a great honor, and a terrifying responsibility- As leaders, as decision-makers, as influencer’s of public opinion, we must do our best to preserve and restore the oceans. Humankind has, unwittingly, assumed the role of executioner of our own planet’s life force. But we can also be saviors, if we choose, and if we are willing to make the sacrifices necessary . . .

Sunrise Port McNeill – looking toward Haddington Island and Sointula. Photo – Hildering.

There is no one here who would not do the very best for their children – the best schools, the best food, the best doctors. Think of the ocean as the ultimate trust fund for your children, a living and life-giving fund.  A healthy ocean is the best gift you can give them . . . l ask everyone. . . to assume a leadership role in guarding and restoring the oceans in all ways, and as a life philosophy.”